Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Cruising the Web

The Republicans caved to Harry Reid's threats on the filibuster and now a bunch of union-backed nominees will find their way on to the NLRB. Let's just remember this precedent the next time the Republicans control both the White House and the Senate. John Fund sums up this whole episode:
It seems there are two consistent points when it comes to filibusters: Each party is capable of abandoning principle to secure a short-term advantage, and it’s almost impossible to convince the public to care about the issue. Only about a fourth of those surveyed by pollsters even know what a filibuster is.

Six inconvenient truths about Obamacare.

Now you can get indulgences for following the Pope and World Youth Day on Twitter. Getting out of Purgatory is getting easier.

The list of prosecutorial misconduct in the Zimmerman case is truly astounding. Of course, Angela Corey, the state attorney in the Zimmerman trial, has a truly disturbing record of personal vendettas and retaliation against those she believes have crossed her.

Arthur Brooks explains how one of the most egregious elements of the IRS scandal is how it led to limiting competition of ideas, one of the most important founding principles of our country.

Candor in speaking honestly about race, as Holder has urged, doesn't include expressing something contrary to the established line on race. Richard Cohen is certainly finding that out. As James Taranto writes about the uproar following Richard Cohen's column that has provoked such a backlash:
If America is a "nation of cowards," it is likely because many people with views similar to Cohen's prefer to avoid the subject rather than endure the unpleasantness and potential serious repercussions that come with the accusation of racism. Holder's call for honest conversation would have some force if he exhorted fellow liberals and fellow blacks to be sensitive to the reasons for these inhibitions. Absent that, it's more lecture than conversation.
Being a feminist seems to mean something different when one is a Democratic politician guilty of sexual misbehavior.

Contrary to what Eric Holder might think, African Americans have benefited from the Stand Your Ground law disproportionately to whites.

Obama vs the unions.

1 comment:

Gahrie said...

The reaction to Cohen's column says much more about his detractors than it does Zimmerman, Martin or even racism. In the last paragraph, Cohen agrees exactly with those opposed to the outcome of the trial:
There’s no doubt in my mind that Zimmerman profiled Martin and, braced by a gun, set off in quest of heroism. The result was a quintessentially American tragedy — the death of a young man understandably suspected because he was black and tragically dead for the same reason.