Banner ad

Wednesday, February 06, 2013

Cruising the Web

Sally Pipes explains how World Health rankings are misleading and thus make the U.S. appear to have much worse health than it does.

Noemie Emery reviews Hillary Clinton's career of deceiving the public. There are probably some moments you might have forgotten. And her latest masterpiece is making anyone think that she was a great Secretary of State despite not being able to name any accomplishment except getting on a plane and traveling to a lot of different countries.

This is smart. The University of Michigan gives its athletes some real lessons in how they can get tricked online by hiring someone to pose as an admiring woman stroking players' egos on social media. And they did this way before the whole Manti T'eo saga became public.

Historian Thomas Fleming recalls the glorious days of Democratic voter fraud in New Jersey.

Joe Biden gaffes his way through Europe.

Don't believe that California has staged a comeback.

Andrew Roberts explains why it is worthwhile learning about the Pantagenet kings. Perhaps the discovery of Richard III's remains will spark interest in this dynasty's rule in England. And it is way past time that we disentangle the real Richard III from the caricature that Shakespeare portrayed. When I was in middle school, I read Thomas Costain's fascinating series of four books about the reign of the Plantagenets starting with The Conquering Family. I couldn't put the books down. They're well worth searching out at your library or used book stores. I've been enthralled with studying history ever since.

This videoof a toddler making buckets is guaranteed to make you smile.
I like how he uses a pacifier much like players use their mouth guards. Look for Titus in about 17 years to be sweeping all the awards.

1 comment:

Pat Patterson said...

In most of the countries that score high on the WHO rankings there is actually a delay in counting a birth as live depending on not only how premature the child was but also its weight. In some cases up to to two years while a death during that time counts as a still birth and is not averaged in the either the infant mortality or longevity figures.