Thursday, June 28, 2012

Cruising the Web

While we're waiting for health care-maggedon, here are some links.

The Washington Post profiles Lyle Denniston, the reporter who makes Scotusblog the excellent site that it is. He came to speak to a teacher workshop I was at a couple of years ago and he was funny and fascinating with all sorts of great anecdotes from his decades reporting on the Supreme Court. His summary of the decisions will be what I'll be looking to for the most authoritative, dispassionate report. To get the most up-to-date reporting on the decision today, log in to the live blog at Scotusblog.

Lyle Denniston provides a useful reader's guide to the health care ruling - the nuts and bolts of what it will look like.

For a little SCOTUS humore, check out tweets on #otherSCOTUSpredictions.

The Obama administration has seen an explosive growth of firearms sales.

Charles Lane, normally even-handed sort of writer, delivers a wonderful smackdown of Andrew Sullivan for applauding the ruling of a Cologne court barring parents from having their children circumcised.

The Romney campaign has issued a detailed point-by-point rebuttal of the Washington Post article depicting supposed outsourcing during Romney's time at Bain. Naturally the Post declines to retract their poorly researched story. Just continuing their in-kind support of the Obama campaign.

Jonathan Turley advocates for a bigger Supreme Court of 19 members so that there wouldn't be so much weight on one person - Anthony Kennedy - to determine how controversial decisions turn out.

The USDA is so eager to get more people to sign up for food stamps that they are suggesting that local offices hold parties to encourage people to register. They're even arguing that food stamp usage would help local economies.

1 comment:

John A said...

"Jonathan Turley advocates for a bigger Supreme Court of 19 members so that there wouldn't be so much weight on one person - Anthony Kennedy - to determine how controversial decisions turn out."

Well, I sort of agree. But to keep one Administration from "packing" the Court (hello, FDR) there would jave to be some limit, sucj as "phasing in the new positions at one new post every third year." A two-term President might get to appoint as many as three new Justices (plus fill existing posts emptied by resignatins or health), even a luck one-termer might get two, but please NOT TEN!