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Monday, June 25, 2012

Cruising the Web

While you're waiting for the Supreme Court to deliver its opinions (though I'd be surprised if health care were today), here are some links.

James Pethokoukis masterfully rebuts the Washington Post story about Romney outsourcing jobs. It's amazing how little of how business works the reporter understands. As Pethokoukis writes,
Apparently in WaPo land, if Romney and Bain invest in a company that a) has overseas operations or b) expands overseas operations or c) is purchased by a company that previous[ly] moved manufacturing operations overseas, it somehow means Romn[a]y and Bain were stealing jobs from America.
But the truth doesn't matter as long as the Obama administration got their talking point. They'll be quoting the false conclusions of this report for the rest of the campaign. And even the Post fact checker ignores the mistakes that their own reporters have made when criticizing the Obama campaign for false ads on this very same issue.

Alas for Democrats, Missouri is no longer a swing state.

Hmm. Political scientists are remarkably weak in being able to predict the future. Remember that as you see them being interviewed all throughout the campaign.

Ross Douhat explains how the hypocrisy of Democrats now defending Obama for doing exactly that for which they excoriated Bush is yet another argument for the brilliance of our constitutional system.

John Fund analyzes the Court's decision last week on SEIU funding for political arguments and notes that even a liberal scholar thinks that the Court is ready to revisit the whole idea of agency shops for public-sector unions in which employees must either join the union or pay fees to cover collective bargaining costs.

So what is Obama spending his campaign money on if it hasn't resulted in movement in his poll numbers?

What makes charter schools successful? Freedom and accountability.

Why is it classified information to find out aggregate information on what food stamps are being spent on?

Do you remember how the media spun images of Gerald Ford or Bob Dole stumbling? It was always seen as a metaphor for a failed and flailing campaign. With Obama, not so. Sometimes a stumble is just a stumble, but not when it's Republicans who are falling.

Jonathan Adler explains how the Roberts court is restrained and deferential to the political branches rather than an ideologically conservative court. It's an important distinction.

James Capretta explains six principles for market-based reform of health care.

Does it matter that Barack Obama fictionalized much of his autobiography? Do we really want a fabulist as president?

Jackson Diehl explains how Obama's waffling has weakened the United States' position in the Middle East.

Here's Obama's pitch for reelection: "Elect me and I’ll spend the political capital of my second term fixing the unpopular, unconstitutional health care law that I wasted the political capital of my first term pushing through. Then I’ll get to the issues that you care about with whatever diminished political capital I have left."

Some are portraying this week's Supreme Court decisions as the most momentous of Obama's reelection campaign. So how is he spending the time? Fundraising, of course.

2 comments:

stan said...

Betsy,

The Tetlock research (which should have been in the lead graf re: the inability of poly sci pundits to predict the future) has implications far beyond political predictions. Read Future Babble by Dan Gardner for a good review of so many bad predictions from the past.

Scientists and economists are no better than political pundits. Predictions are hard, especially of the future.

equitus said...

Political Science has no business calling itself a "science."