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Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Cruising the Web

Carl Cannon looks at eight historical criteria for choosing a vice president. All very interesting, but I still think it will be Rob Portman.

Mickey Kaus asks whether President Obama believe the BS he's spouting or does he just not care?

Robert Samuelson is so exactly right. We have made a mistake selling the idea that college is for everyone. Instead, we should have more apprenticeship programs in high school. It's such a shame that we have abandoned the vocational ed model for teenagers.
The real concern is the quality of graduates at all levels. The fixation on college-going, justified in the early postwar decades, stigmatizes those who don't go to college and minimizes their needs for more vocational skills. It cheapens the value of a college degree and spawns the delusion that only the degree -- not the skills and knowledge behind it -- matters. We need to rethink.
So what does it mean when a black Democrat becomes a Republican?

It is but to laugh: The NEA's in-house labor union is picketing the NEA over the same principle that they're demanding of school districts.

This is how absurd Illinois' fiscal situation is.
Many teachers don't pay a penny toward pensions but can retire at age 60 with an annuity equal to 65% of their final salary plus a 3% annual compounded cost-of-living increase. The state's pension bill, which has quadrupled in five years, consumes all $7 billion of additional revenue from last year's income and corporate tax hikes. Even so, the pension funds are projected to go bust in a decade.

Rating agencies have threatened Illinois with a multiple-notch downgrade if lawmakers don't restructure benefits in their budget due this week. The raters worry that pensions are causing the state to delay payments to creditors—Illinois has a $9 billion backlog of unpaid bills—and squeezing local budgets, thereby making municipal defaults more likely. Mr. Emanuel is warning that retirement costs could drive up Chicago's property taxes by 150% over the next three years and increase class sizes to 55 students.
Thus the results of Democratic policies buying union support by mortgaging the future of their states and communities. And they're so beholden that they can't fix the problems they caused. And they want to recall those Republicans like Scott Walker with the courage and clear-thinking to tackle those problems. And Barack Obama continues the lies that no benefits have to be trimmed if we could just tax enough Warren Buffets.

Cheers to the Senate Appropriations Committee for voting
for an amendment to a bill to change back the definition of Palestinian refugee to refer only to those who were originally refugees from 1948 and not all their descendants. This would return the definition to what it was for every other war except the 1948 Israeli War of Independence.

Tom Barrett thinks Wisconsinites should vote for him because he'll do more to create jobs; I guess they're supposed to just trust his secret plan since he can't be bothered to tell them how he'd accomplish that goal.

Jim Geraghty ponders the "strategic amnesia campaign."

This is truly funny: Jay Carney trying to explain the difference between Bain Capital and Obama's green energy program.
Reporter: Last thing. If that’s the argument, how is that different from Romney’s argument on Bain Capital, which is that many succeeded and a few failed?

Carney: Look, there, there, there is the… the difference in that… your overall view of what your responsibilities are as president, and what your view of the economic future is. And, and the president believes, as he’s made clear, that a president’s responsibility is not just to, uh… those who win, but those who, for an example, in a company where there have been layoffs or a company that has gone bankrupt, that, you know, we have to make sure that those folks have the means to find other employment, that they have the ability to train for other kinds of work, and that’s part of the overall responsibility the president has.
Isn't the real difference that Bain didn't indulge in crony capitalism and actually invested in many businesses that became successful enterprises? Allahpundit has another difference.
For one thing, Bain evidently did due diligence on the companies it bought instead of rushing them through so that the president of the firm could get a sweet photo op. For another thing, when one of Bain’s acquisitions failed, it wasn’t your taxpayer dollars that went down the toilet with it.


It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of people: NEA is losing members and money.

Why is David Axelrod, the President's political adviser, attending the meetings deciding who will be placed on his 'Kill List'? Are these political decisions? Or is this why the whole story got leaked in the first place - for political reasons?

Ed Rogers writes that it is time
for the Democrats to decide if they want an idol or a president.
Frank Bruni, writing in the New York Times, suggests the left is going to double-down on the theme of Obama as the chosen one and his followers as enlightened. Bruni appears to be willing to strain even harder for Obama in 2012 by neglecting to find anything particularly admirable about Mitt Romney while completely refreshing the Obama myth. He never hints that the reality of electing a president who was a little-accomplished state senator, unknown community organizer and high school stoner has produced some disappointments and required plenty of on-the-job training. You have to read it to get the full dose, but among other things, Bruni says of Obama, "He still personifies the hope that we might evolve into the colorblind, fair-minded country that many of us want. His own saga taps into the larger story of this country's fitful unfinished progress toward its stated ideal of equal opportunity."

Like other liberals, Bruni credits Obama's charmed life so far as being "his journey." Conversely, he is not only condescending to Mitt Romney but finds fault with him, saying, "He hasn't succeeded in rummaging through his biography for the sorts of broadly inspirational chapters that can help a candidate bond with voters."
Ah, so that is what makes Obama a good president - he can rummage through his biography to sell a load of malarkey to susceptible naifs who think that is more important than his actual policies and accomplishments. Good to know.

1 comment:

Marshall said...

RE: Samuelson's column

The "problem didn't start with the GI bill. Trace it back to the Civil Rights Act (and the law of unintended consequences).

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits employment tests (when used as a decisive factor in employment decisions) that are not a "reasonable measure of job performance," regardless of the absence of actual intent to discriminate. Duke Power's employee transfer procedure which involved aptitude tests and a high school diploma requirement was found by the Court's Griggs v. Duke Power Co., 401 U.S. 424 (1971) to be in violation of the Act.

As a result, employers began to use college degrees as a surrogate for IQ testing.

A similar thing happened in public education. When I was educated (in the fifties), schools separated classes by student performance. This was sensible and defensible. It's just more efficient to cast students into cohorts that can learn at the same rate. The problem was that the black kids ended up disproportionately in the lower tiers. Nowadays we have "gifted and talented" programs that every once in awhile lift the smarter kits out for a breather (lest they damage their desks by excessively banging their heads).

Haven't you noticed the dearth of common sense?