Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Obsolescence comes fast these days

Building on a slide show from the Huffington Post on things that became obsolete in the past decade such as VCRs, travel agents, paper maps, newspaper classifieds, the Yellow Pages, and landline phones, Money Talk News has a list of things that babies born in 2011 will never know.
Long distance: Thanks to the Internet, the days of paying more to talk to somebody in the next city, state, or even country are limited.

Dial-up Internet: While not everyone is on broadband, it won't be long before dial-up Internet goes the way of the plug-in phone.

Encyclopedias: Imagine a time when you had to buy expensive books that were outdated before the ink was dry. This will be a nonsense term for babies born today.

Forgotten friends: Remember when an old friend would bring up someone you went to high school with, and you'd say, "Oh yeah, I forgot about them!" The next generation will automatically be in touch with everyone they've ever known even slightly via Facebook.

Forgotten anything else: Kids born this year will never know what it was like to stand in a bar and incessantly argue the unknowable. Today the world's collective knowledge is on the computer in your pocket or purse. And since you have it with you at all times, why bother remembering anything?

Talking to one person at a time: Remember when it was rude to be with one person while talking to another on the phone? Kids born today will just assume that you're supposed to use texting to maintain contact with five or six other people while pretending to pay attention to the person you happen to be physically next to.

Retirement plans: Yes, Johnny, there was a time when all you had to do was work at the same place for 20 years and they'd send you a check every month for as long as you lived. In fact, some companies would even pay your medical bills, too!

1 comment:

Pat Patterson said...

I'm not to sure about the bar argument. For example sometimes after we have discussed something in class some kids will show up the next day with proof that my statement was wrong. The problem is that they regard the OED, hip hop lyrics and urban lexicons as equal in authority.