Wednesday, February 17, 2010

How losing in 2008 benefited the GOP

Politico looks at Obama's electoral map in retreat. Several swing states that Obama won in 2008 and where he swept in Democrats down ticket are now looking to swing back. What strikes me is how the Democrats' electoral victories in 2006 and 2008 may ultimately prove to be a boon to the Republicans. The Democrats took power at the onset of the economic downturn and they're now taking the blame for the sluggish improvement in the economy. If the GOP wins the wave election that they seem set up to win this year, they'll not only take seats in Congress, but they'll win governorships and take back houses of state legislatures.

If we're facing major Republican victories at the state level in 2010, they'll be in place to direct redistricting after the census. Such victories will be longer-lasting than winning in 2008 would have been.

So in a totally cynical way, the losses in the last election were medicine that will ultimately make the GOP stronger. It swept out some weak reeds who the party will be stronger without. It revealed to the electorate how Democrats govern when they have total power and the picture was not edifying. And the GOP will win across the country in the election that matters when it comes to redistricting.

7 comments:

Ron K said...

they will still try an blame it on Bush, even though Obama/Biden were both in congress and did nothing to avert the disaster.

Rick Caird said...

Trying to blame it on Bush is not the same as being successful at blaming Bush. I really get tired of hearing Obama claiming he inherited a fiscal mess. No he didn't. He volunteered. I distinctly remember Obama and McCain in meetings with Bush where the problems were discussed.

Pat Patterson said...

I saw a bumper sticker on a Mercedes yesterday that said, "See, I Told Everyone to Vote For Hillary."

John A said...

I fear I am not very confidet that the national Republican organisation is paying attention even now. Local and State, perhaps - but in some cases (NY, PA) where conservatives showed well in primary run-ups the National org seems to have quickly funneled money to RINO types.

Pat Patterson said...

Michael Steele had several Tea Party people in for a conference that went over four hours instead of the allotted one. That is a glimmer as long as the RNC realizes that they better cooperate instead of trying to co-opt the movement.

Though some of the people in my local party organization, a few, think that the Tea Party represents the kind of voter suppression for Republicans as did Perot. But failed to notice that we are currently leading upt to a off-year election not a presidential election and that it appears that the Tea Party groups expect a certain amount of orthodoxy on economic issues they are vocal but hardly threatening the apostates on social issues.

Bachbone said...

Perhaps the best eye opener for the GOP will come this November with what takes place in Arizona's (AZ) senatorial primary. McCain has competition from J.D. Hayworth, who is endorsed by Sheriff Joe Arpaio, overwhelmingly supported (himself) by the public in polls. AZ voters are likely to remember McCain's fondness (with SC's Lindsey Graham) for amnesty for illegals, though he's now saying he's seen the error of his ways and modified his stance. I don't know much about Hayworth, but he's been hitting hard on the amnesty matter, and his lifetime ACU rating while in the House was 98%, while McCain's is 82.3%. If McCain loses the primary to Hayworth, a lot of GOP pols' hearts will get that old time conservative religion in a hurry.

Ron K said...

Rick - I agree with you but they are already doing the inherited part, even Bill OReilly fell in to that trap already did. The thing is Obama/Biden both were in congress 3/34 years, the Republicans never had an overwhelming majority so everything done was bipartisan in nature.