Wednesday, November 11, 2009

If you loved HMO's, get excited about "medical homes"

Remember when HMOs were the bright idea that was going to lower medical costs? It turned out that people didn't like having to go to one doctor to ask for referrals for all their other treatments. Well, the PelosiCare bill passed last weekend has a similar construct for Medicare recipients. Betsy McCaughey explains,
• Sec. 1302 (pp. 672-692) moves Medicare from a fee-for-service payment system, in which patients choose which doctors to see and doctors are paid for each service they provide, toward what's called a "medical home."

The medical home is this decade's version of HMO-restrictions on care. A primary-care provider manages access to costly specialists and diagnostic tests for a flat monthly fee. The bill specifies that patients may have to settle for a nurse practitioner rather than a physician as the primary-care provider. Medical homes begin with demonstration projects, but the HHS secretary is authorized to "disseminate this approach rapidly on a national basis."

A December 2008 Congressional Budget Office report noted that "medical homes" were likely to resemble the unpopular gatekeepers of 20 years ago if cost control was a priority.
This is what AARP has endorsed. I wonder how many senior citizens are on board for these changes. But you might argue that this is what we need to do bring Medicare costs down. But that isn't all that is in this bill.
While the bill will slash Medicare funding, it will also direct billions of dollars to numerous inner-city social work and diversity programs with vague standards of accountability.

• Sec. 399V (p. 1422) provides for grants to community "entities" with no required qualifications except having "documented community activity and experience with community healthcare workers" to "educate, guide, and provide experiential learning opportunities" aimed at drug abuse, poor nutrition, smoking and obesity. "Each community health worker program receiving funds under the grant will provide services in the cultural context most appropriate for the individual served by the program."

These programs will "enhance the capacity of individuals to utilize health services and health related social services under Federal, State and local programs by assisting individuals in establishing eligibility . . . and in receiving services and other benefits" including transportation and translation services....

• Secs. 2521 and 2533 (pp. 1379 and 1437) establishes racial and ethnic preferences in awarding grants for training nurses and creating secondary-school health science programs. For example, grants for nursing schools should "give preference to programs that provide for improving the diversity of new nurse graduates to reflect changes in the demographics of the patient population." And secondary-school grants should go to schools "graduating students from disadvantaged backgrounds including racial and ethnic minorities."
How will those grants be meted out without using numerical quotas counting up how many of the correct minorities are in each school?

1 comment:

Timothy said...

So, Atlanta should start funding more white or hispanic nurses and turning down black applicants as that is the current demographic trend?

That's going to be wildly popular...