Monday, January 09, 2006

Gee, Joe Klein has a column that makes a good point. IT's been a while since that happened. He reviews Nancy Pelosi's release of a letter that supposedly expressed her qualms about the NSA surveillance program. However, her letter had nothing to do with that program - it was just an attempt to show that she had concerns and voiced them at the time even thought it was about something else. And her response showed exactly how she was trying to conflate two programs to achieve some sort of political reaction.
When I asked the Congresswoman about this, she said, "Some in the government have accused me of confusing apples and oranges. My response is, it's all fruit."

A dodgy response at best, but one invested with a larger truth. For too many liberals, all secret intelligence activities are "fruit," and bitter fruit at that. The government is presumed guilty of illegal electronic eavesdropping until proven innocent. This sort of civil-liberties fetishism is a hangover from the Vietnam era, when the Nixon Administration wildly exceeded all bounds of legality—spying on antiwar protesters and civil rights leaders.
"It's all fruit." In other words, if I can mislead people and use the media to score a point it will be worth it. Who cares about the danger the country is in from terrorists. It's all about the politics. And Klein is trying to tell Democrats that they're preparing for another defeat if they think that the American people don't want the administration to be as active as possible in protecting us. Sure, he takes the obligatory swipe at the administration, but Klein recognizes that nothing good has come from the New York Times story.
When I asked the Congresswoman about this, she said, "Some in the government have accused me of confusing apples and oranges. My response is, it's all fruit."

A dodgy response at best, but one invested with a larger truth. For too many liberals, all secret intelligence activities are "fruit," and bitter fruit at that. The government is presumed guilty of illegal electronic eavesdropping until proven innocent. This sort of civil-liberties fetishism is a hangover from the Vietnam era, when the Nixon Administration wildly exceeded all bounds of legality—spying on antiwar protesters and civil rights leaders.
Since the GOP is so likely to mess things up and give people few reasons to support them, it's a blessing to them to be opposed by such short-sighted Democrats who will not present much of an alternative.

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